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http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/461970

Rabbit run /

Twenty-six year old Harry Rabbit Angstrom is tired of marriage and the responsibilities and leaves his pregnant wife in his attempt to run away.

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http://schema.org/description

  • "Twenty-six year old Harry Rabbit Angstrom is tired of marriage and the responsibilities and leaves his pregnant wife in his attempt to run away."@en
  • "An allegory of freedom versus responsibility, in which twenty-six year old Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom is tired of marriage and the responsibilities that life entails and leaves his pregnant wife."@en
  • "Harry Angstrom was a star basketball player in high school and that was the best time of his life. Now in his mid-20s, his work is suffering, his marriage is moribund, and he tries to find happiness with another woman. But happiness is more elusive than a medal, and Harry must continue to run--from his wife, his life, and from himself, until he reaches the end of the road and has to turn back."
  • "John Updike's Rabbit, Run is a classic story of dissatisfaction and restlessness. Harry 'Rabbit' Angstrom was a star basketball player in high school. Now twenty-six, his life seems full of traps, the biggest being his pregnant wife and two-year-old son."
  • "Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom was a star basketball player in high school and that was the best time of his life. Now he is in his mid-20s and is a salesman in a local department store, father of a preschool-age son, and husband to an alcoholic wife who was his second-best high school sweetheart. The squalor and tragedy of their lives reminds us that salvation is a personal undertaking."@en
  • ""Contemporary in setting and tone, and brilliant in its evocation of everyday life in America, the novel is about Harry Angstrom ('Rabbit'), a salesman who, on an impulse, leaves home, his alcoholic wife, Janice, and his child, Nelson, to find freedom. After several escapades and a liaison with an ex-prostitute, he returns to his wife and child and attempts to settle down again. In this novel, Updike conveys the longings and frustrations of family life. Rabbit's malaise is not so much a yearning for freedom as, perhaps, a yearning for guiding spiritual values and meaning. At the end, still dissatisfied and guilt-ridden because of the responsibility he feels for the death of his second child, he begins running again." Reader's Ency. 3d edition."
  • ""Contemporary in setting and tone, and brilliant in its evocation of everyday life in America, the novel is about Harry Angstrom ('Rabbit'), a salesman who, on an impulse, leaves home, his alcoholic wife, Janice, and his child, Nelson, to find freedom. After several escapades and a liaison with an ex-prostitute, he returns to his wife and child and attempts to settle down again. In this novel, Updike conveys the longings and frustrations of family life. Rabbit's malaise is not so much a yearning for freedom as, perhaps, a yearning for guiding spiritual values and meaning. At the end, still dissatisfied and guilt-ridden because of the responsibility he feels for the death of his second child, he begins running again." Reader's Ency. 3d edition."@en
  • "A bleak look at married life in central Pennsylvania, and a young man's futile attempt to flee his own unhappiness."@en
  • "Tired of the responsibility of married life, Rabbit Angstrom leaves his wife and home."@en
  • "Henry (Rabbit) Angstrom is 26, an ex-basketball star who is tired of his pregnant wife. So he runs away with a prostitute but returns home at the birth of his child. The baby's accidental death ends the marriage."@en
  • "Harry Angstrom was a star basketball player in high school and that was the best time of his life. Now in his mid-20s, his work is unfulfilling, his marriage is moribund, and he tries to find happiness with another woman."@en
  • "Harry Angstrom was a star basketball player in high school, and that was the best time of his life. Now in his mid-20s his work in unfulfilling, his marriage is moribund, snd he tries to find happiness with another woman. But happiness is more elusive than a medal, and Harry must continue to run - from his wife, his life and from himself."@en
  • "Twenty-two-year-old Rabbit Angstrom is a salesman in a local department store, father of a preschool-age son, and husband to an alcoholic wife who was his second-best high school sweetheart. The squalor and tragedy of their lives reminds us that salvation is a personal undertaking."@en
  • "Twenty-two-year-old Rabbit Angstrom is a salesman in a local department store, father of a preschool-age son, and husband to an alcoholic wife who was his second-best high school sweetheart. The squalor and tragedy of their lives reminds us that salvation is a personal undertaking."
  • "Een man voelt zich niet meer opgewassen tegen het leven en besluit vrouw en werk te ontvluchten."
  • "Rabbit, Run is the book that established John Updike as one of the major American novelists of his'or any other'generation. Its hero is Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom, a onetime high-school basketball star who on an impulse deserts his wife and son. He is twenty-six years old, a man-child caught in a struggle between instinct and thought, self and society, sexual gratification and family duty'even, in a sense, human hard-heartedness and divine Grace. Though his flight from home traces a zigzag of evasion, he holds to the faith that he is on the right path, an invisible line toward his own salvation as straight as a ruler's edge."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Powieść amerykańska"
  • "Psychological fiction."@en
  • "Psychological fiction."
  • "Genres littéraires."
  • "Fiction"
  • "Fiction"@en
  • "Psychological fiction"
  • "Psychological fiction"@en
  • "Roman américain."
  • "Electronic books."@en
  • "Electronic books."
  • "Americké romány."
  • "Fiction."
  • "Fiction."@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Rabbit, run. [Printed from new plates]."
  • "Rabbit run /"@en
  • "Rabbit run /"
  • "Rabbit, Run."@en
  • "Rabbit, Run."
  • "Rabbit, Run /"
  • "Rabbit, run"
  • "Rabbit, run"@en
  • "Rabbit, Run"
  • "Rabbit, run /"@en
  • "Rabbit, run /"
  • "Rabbit Run /"
  • "Rabbit, run."@en
  • "Rabbit, run."
  • "Rabbit run."@en
  • "Rabbit, run. [1st ed.]."@en
  • "Rabbit run"
  • "Rabbit run"@en
  • "Rabbit, run : [a novel] /"

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